Vaporized Hydrogen Peroxide Calculations & Formulas

Conversions formulas for vaporized hydrogen peroxide
Life Science
A reproducible bio-decontamination process requires reliable means of controlling and monitoring the environment. While knowing the operating principle and specifications of your measurement instrument is important, understanding the different measurement parameters and their dependencies is equally important.
 
In this webinar, we discuss the methods for calculating different humidity and vaporized hydrogen peroxide variables, such as: relative saturation, parts per million, and mixture dew point temperature. A better understanding of these variables can help you to take this knowledge into practice, such as calculating VH2O2 concentrations in different types of bio-decontamination processes.
 
Webinar attendees will receive a downloadable Excel calculator tool for VH2O2 variables.
 
Outline:
• The theory behind vaporized hydrogen peroxide measurement
• Overview of common calculation formulas
• Practical calculation examples for different VH2O2 bio-decontamination methods:
  • Open circulation
  • Closed circulation
  • Free evaporation

 

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Joni Partanen

Joni Partanen

Product Engineer

Joni Partanen is a Product Engineer at Vaisala focusing on humidity and dew point measurement instruments. He has over 14 years of experience in process industry measurement technology and instrumentation. Joni holds a Bachelor of Engineering degree in Automation Technology.

Irene Zakrzewski, Research Scientist, Vaisala

Irene Zakrzewski

Research Scientist
Irene Zakrzewski is a Research Scientist in Vaisala’s Industrial Measurements business area. She has over 10 years of R&D experience in sensor development, measurement technology and project management. Irene holds a Masters of Science in Electrical Engineering from Tampere University of Technology. In her current position, she develops devices for life science applications. Irene is inspired by state-of-the-art measurement of environmental parameters. Her current challenge is to continuously increase her understanding of different parameters and apply that knowledge to the development of novel measurement techniques.