Skip Ribbon Commands
Skip to main content

NextGen and Sesar – future for commercial aviation?

NextGen and Sesar – future for commercial aviation?
The aviation environment is changing rapidly today and weather plays an important role in this change. What does this mean for your airport? How is the role of airport weather information changing?

​​​​The aviation environment is changing rapidly today and weather plays an important role in this change.

SESAR web pages state: “SESAR aims at developing the new generation air traffic management system capable of ensuring the safety and fluidity of air transport worldwide over the next 30 years.”

FAA web pages state: “NextGen is a wide ranging transformation of the entire national air transportation system — not just certain pieces of it — to meet future demands and avoid gridlock in the sky and in the airports.”

What does this mean for your airport? How is the role of airport weather information changing?

Former Chief of ICAO’s Meteorology Section, Dr. Olli Turpeinen will address these issues during this webinar.

Questions & Answers

Q: It feels like we are making it much more complex to pass MET info to the pilot, or is that just from my perspective?
A: This is certainly not the purpose. Information, additional to, or different from, that provided today will certainly be available. However, the users organizations (IATA, IFALPA, IFATCA etc.) will be involved in the development process to ensure that user needs be met and that unnecessary complications be avoided.

Q: Can you comment on the plan to develop a PANS for MET and how that would differ from the Annex?
A: If the forthcoming MET Divisional Meeting endorses this plan, it will simply render it possible to separate two types of Annex 3 provisions: genuine Standards and Recommended Practices (to remain in Annex 3) and procedures (to be transferred to a new PANS document). As procedures tend to change more frequently and as the amendment process to PANS is less stringent, the proposed split of Annex 3 into a «reduced» Annex and PANS will make ICAO more responsive to future changes.

Q: Are more ground-based weather systems needed?
A: It appears very likely. However, the precise future requirements are to be considered by the new expert/task team to be established after the MET Divisional Meeting in July 2014. The future group should come up with concrete proposals by 2020.

Q: How do you view the relationship between ATM and MET, that in the past it has not been strong?
A: Unfortunately, in the past this relationship has not been close enough, in my view. However, there are encouraging signs that things are changing; the ATM community now realizes that for their future system, the MET information constitutes an essential component.

Q: The presentation concentrated on uplinking MET data to the cockpit. From an AMDAR Programme point of view, do you see the increased need for MET information being downlinked ie AMDAR, ADS/Mode-S to be integrated to MET info being relayed to ATM, airline operations and the cockpit?
A: AMDAR programme provides basic MET data which is a prerogative of WMO. Nevertheless, it may be assumed that needs for that type of info will increase (subject to confirmation by WMO). Direct relay of MET info from ADS/Mode S to ATM will have to be addressed by the new expert/task team to be established after the MET Divisional Meeting (2014).

Q: Your presentation indicates that ICAO should lead the changes. What part does RTCA and Eurocae Working Groups have to play in pulling the Global Community together?
A: The presentation may give the false impression that ICAO is the only player. However, the ICAO process includes all the stakeholders, and in this case RTCA and Eurocae. It should be emphasized that ICAO depends heavily on the work of States, international organizations and industry. ICAO is simply a forum that tries to pull all the stakeholders together in view of building consensus amongst them.

​​

​Speaker:
Dr. Olli Turpeinen holds a Ph. D. in meteorology from McGill University, Montréal, Canada, a M. Sc. in meteorology from University of Helsinki, Finland and works as an independent consultant in aeronautical meteorology. He has over 20 years of experience working for the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO), 1990-2011. During the last nine years, he was the Chief of Meteorology Section of the ICAO Air Navigation Bureau.

Related webinars